Submissions

The Isis TT22: Decadence

Pitches for TT22 are now closed. However, you may still submit a Short.

Letters to the Editor, brief quips on university life, your favourite hot take condensed into little more than two paragraphs….

Missed our pitching window? Want to contribute but don’t want to write an entire piece? Submit to our Shorts with your comments of up to 80 words. We welcome any of your remarks on previous articles, comments on Oxford goings-on or general witticisms.  If you’d like to have yours considered for publication in the physical magazine at the end of term, deadline for submission is FRIDAY 3RD MAY (Week 6). Submit here: https://forms.gle/FSbviGJQoDbuXYow5 open to all.


After years of being shut in, we all deserve a little self-indulgence. Unpack your party frocks, dust off your pearls, and join us in our exploration of decadence. This term’s edition will be an aesthetic and experimental exploration of art and life, where the two meet, and where they potentially diverge. 

Once used as a diseased term of hostile criticism hurled at French writers like Baudelaire, to be ‘decadent’ now is to yield to one’s niche interests, to explore the nature of beauty and the richness of inner-life, to go all out. 

As the summer of love comes upon us, who better to share your visions of revelry and excess with? Give us your wit, your flair, your degeneracy, in written or visual form, as we prepare for a term of art for its own sake.


The Isis is now accepting pitches for our TT22 issue: Decadence. Send us your writing, interviews, artwork, and other creative projects as full drafts, works-in-progress, budding ideas, or in any other form you can think of. 

This term, we are especially interested in pitches engaging with traditional forms of poetry and prose, pieces of satire and critique, and unique perspectives on the Decadent movement in art and literature. We are also eager for pieces that explore the negative connotations of decadence, such as perceived social degeneration and moral decay.  Remember that the theme is a creative guide – your pitch need not to conform to it necessarily.

Any student from any university is allowed to pitch. Our previous magazine editions can be found at https://issuu.com/theisis. For a look at the Editors’ visual inspiration behind our theme, check out our Pinterest board: Decadence TT22 on Pinterest.


All pitches are anonymised before review.

Don’t think your best work fits our theme? Pitch anyway – we’ll find a place for it…

Don’t think your work’s much good? We’re sure it probably is… No harm sending it our way.

EXPERIENCE NOT REQUIRED

There is no ‘Isis writer’ – anyone can submit, anyone can be published. We are committed to bringing out the best in between experienced and new authors alike and encourage everyone to submit, whether they have experience or not, whether they’ve submitted before or not, whether they know people on the team or not. We want to publish content which represents the extraordinary diversity our University has to offer – so look forward to hearing what you have to say.

A few guidelines are below:

  • As well as fully formed submissions, we welcome original pitches our editorial team will help you to shape your piece. For pitches where the piece has not yet been written, please provide as detailed a plan as possible, as well as an up-to-date sample of your previous work in the genre if you have one. We don’t just want to know what you’re going to say we want to know how you’re going to say it
  • We look for previously unpublished content that is a compelling and original read
  • Our best articles vary in their focus and nature. The best way to see what an Isis piece might look like is to have a browse of our website. You will soon realise that our scope is endless the key is just to ensure that your words will have relevance beyond the 24 hours news cycle. If you seek to write an opinion piece on current affairs, make sure you add a new perspective to the debate
  • We are interested in Oxford-centric content, as long as it has significance outside the University’s bubble. What is important is that the articles are somewhat evergreen and appealing to many different types of audience
  • If you are pitching a poem or short story, it is particularly important that you include an entire draft of your work in your pitch
  • Outside of the magazine pitching period, if you do not hear back about your pitch within two weeks, please contact us at [email protected]
  • If we do not accept your pitch before or after the editing process, we are happy to provide feedback upon request at [email protected] Please do not let this dissuade you from pitching again – some of our best work comes from authors whose previous submissions didn’t make it to publication!
  • If you are a member of The Isis team, please pitch under a pseudonym as we wish all work to be edited fairly and impartially during the term.
  • As ever, if you have an idea but are unsure about how to develop it, pitch it to us anyway – we can help with the development. Do also contact us on [email protected] if you have any other questions.
  • We anonymise pitches before review

Sample Non-Fiction pitch, credit to Elliot Rose:

Note that this is not an indicator of how long or detailed pitches should be – this is just to show that what we look for in a pitch is a clear line of argument, preliminary research, and an original take.

“Moral sensationalism has always weaponised children.

Much is currently written about transgender children, little of it by trans people themselves. This would seek to rectify that. At its core, this article would be a comparison between the Victorian Maiden Tribute of Modern Babylon tabloid scandal and the ongoing Bell v. Tavistock legal case. Both perversely centre children’s bodies, and both led to socially conservative judgments under the veneer of progress – namely the Criminal Law Amendment (1885) and the December 2020 judgment. I would explore how moralisers across both centuries weaponised the image of the child in popular imagination to justify stripping minority groups of legal rights, whilst being cheered on by feminist campaigners. The core message is that these tactics are not new, and anyone swept in this anti-transgender hysteria must be aware of its ability to cause serious material harm to any minority group.”

 

 

[email protected]